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We have a 2017 Buick Envision FWD Essence with the 2.5L; 6-Spd Auto.

We would like to tow a small (under 3,000lbs) travel trailer with it, but as per the manual, maximum towing capacity is 1,500lbs with GM hitch p/n84245127.

Yet, Curt sells a hitch with a 3,500lb capacity and Draw-Tite sells a hitch with a 4,500lb capacity.
Is it safe to install one of these hitches and use it on the Envision to tow a small travel
trailer? If so, are any modification that needed to the engine and transmission to safely tow?
Any and all advise will be appreciated.
 

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Hi, here is my 2 cents as I am no expert. If the car is not rated to tow in excess of 1,500 lbs, I myself would not do it. You may find it can and will tow that amount but the car is not designed for it, you will probably experience premature wear and tear and you may void your warranty. Generally the car is 'engineered in' to manage the trailering including transmission and drive train durability and capability. Not sure why the Equinox is rated higher as they are similar architecture but it may be in fact the drive train differences that provide the Equinox with additional capabilities. In the 70's a friend of mine bought a 70 bare bones Plymouth Duster with a 198 slant 6 and 3 speed shift. He insisted it could handle towing a 15 foot fiberglass runabout boat we used on LI sound. The problem was he kept burning out clutches between the weight of 4 of us and the pulling of the boat (belabored up Branford Hill). This is not to say that the small naturally aspirated 198 cu. in. engine was worked into overtime. Net/Net the car lasted less than it should have giving out at the 90K mark. We have the turbo 2.0 and although competent it is far less powerful than the v6 (3.6 Equinox) we turned in. That said I would imagine the 2.5 has even less get up and go. Given the car is heavy to begin with (a good thing it is solidly built and does very well in all crash testing) adding a trailer in tow seems like you will be really taxing its capabilities. Again just my 2 cents.
 

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Hi, here is my 2 cents as I am no expert. If the car is not rated to tow in excess of 1,500 lbs, I myself would not do it. You may find it can and will tow that amount but the car is not designed for it, you will probably experience premature wear and tear and you may void your warranty. Generally the car is 'engineered in' to manage the trailering including transmission and drive train durability and capability. Not sure why the Equinox is rated higher as they are similar architecture but it may be in fact the drive train differences that provide the Equinox with additional capabilities. In the 70's a friend of mine bought a 70 bare bones Plymouth Duster with a 198 slant 6 and 3 speed shift. He insisted it could handle towing a 15 foot fiberglass runabout boat we used on LI sound. The problem was he kept burning out clutches between the weight of 4 of us and the pulling of the boat (belabored up Branford Hill). This is not to say that the small naturally aspirated 198 cu. in. engine was worked into overtime. Net/Net the car lasted less than it should have giving out at the 90K mark. We have the turbo 2.0 and although competent it is far less powerful than the v6 (3.6 Equinox) we turned in. That said I would imagine the 2.5 has even less get up and go. Given the car is heavy to begin with (a good thing it is solidly built and does very well in all crash testing) adding a trailer in tow seems like you will be really taxing its capabilities. Again just my 2 cents.
Well said, Atlantic.
 
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